The Mallards


THE MALLARDS AND THEIR NEIGHBORS

The Old Homestead Tales- # 2

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Neil Wayne Northey

1930

Contents

Introduction

1. THE ARRIVAL OF THE MALLARDS

2. THE DUCK POND

3. MRS. MALLARD MAKES A DISCOVERY

4. REDWING THE BLACKBIRD MOVES IN

5. TERROR THE HUNTER MAKES A MISTAKE

6. LONGLEGS THE HERON GOES WADING

7. LUTRA THE OTTER PLAYS A GAME

8. MR. MALLARD FLIES AGAIN 

9. TRAILER THE MINK TAKES A HUNT

10. MRS. MALLARD BUILDS A NEST

11. A NIGHT PROWLER 

12. BIGMOUTH THE PELICAN GOES SEINING

13. JIM CROW GETS CAUGHT 

14. THE MUSKRATS HAVE A VISITOR

15. DANNY MUSKRAT FINDS SOMETHING GOOD 

16. THE FLUFFY DUCKLETS APPEAR

17. BILLY COON MAKES SOME PLANS

18. THE DUCKLETS TAKE A SWIM 

19. ALCYON THE KINGFISHER PROVES A FRIEND 

20. RANGER THE COYOTE MEETS HIS MATCH 

21. SPINK THE BOBOLINK SINGS A SONG 

22. MR. BLUEBIRD VISITS THE DUCK POND 

23. SAW-WHET THE OWL IS DISAPPOINTED

24. BUD SMITH SETS A TRAP

25. THE MALLARDS ARE CAUGHT 

26. A NEW EXPERIENCE FOR THE MALLARDS 

27. A VISIT WITH SANDHILL THE CRANE 

28. HONKER THE GOOSE TAKES A REST 

29. THE YOUNG MALLARDS HEAR A STORY 

30. "GOOD-BY, OLD HOMESTEAD"

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Introduction

THIS is another story of the Old Homestead, and especially about the Little Wild Creatures that lived at the Duck Pond on the Old Homestead. You have met a few of them in the story about "The Bluebirds and Their Neighbors," but most of them are new acquaintances.

You see, the Bluebirds and their neighbors were mostly Furry Friends and Feathered Friends, who lived near the Grand Old House, or in the Apple Orchard, or along the Hedgerow, or at the Rambling Old Barn, or in the Little Jungle Thicket, where Molly and Peter lived. But the Mallards and their neighbors lived at the Duck Pond, and along Little River, which flowed through the Old Homestead. They liked to play in the water and among the Fuzzy Cat-tails along the Marshy Banks.

Perhaps you will think that some of the Mallard's neighbors were not very kind to them, and that is true. Many times even Fearful the Man is not so friendly as he should be toward the Feathered Friends and Furry Friends who are his neighbors. And so they have grown to be afraid of him. If we are kind to the Little Wild Creatures, they will learn that we are their friends, and then they will trust us.

As I write this, I look out through my workroom window and see Mrs. Ringneck the Pheasant sneaking through the Green Alfalfa in search of a Secret Nesting Place. Burlingame the Meadow Lark is singing his best from the top of a fence post. Robin Red is spying out Wiggly Earthworms on the lawn. Mrs. Bluebird is busy carrying bits of soft grass into her new Nesting Box, while Mr. Bluebird stands guard. Noisy the English Sparrow is scolding because he cannot be in a dozen places at once to bully his neighbors. Down in the swamp Redwing the Blackbird sings "Oak´┐Ża-lee" from morning till night. And everything tells me that Jolly Spring is here.

How nice it will be in the New Earth, when life will be Eternal Springtime and the Little Creatures will no longer be wild! Then Jack Frost will not destroy the Dancing Little Leaflets and Fragrant Flowers, nor Old Man Winter drive away our Feathered Friends every year; for there will be no such thing as a year.

THE AUTHOR.

Denver, Colorado, April 11, 1930.

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